Honda Trike

Motorcycle Trike

Motorcycle Trike

Motorcycle Trike

Motorcycle Trike

Because of the extra weight of the VW front end I had to think of ways to keep the weight down. I decided on coroplast. This I’ve used before on other projects and, although it won’t last many years, It still is unbeatable for weight, time and money savings. It also comes in a variety of neat colors. I chose Yellow for safety. The most eye catching of all colors.
Aluminum threshhold trim was used to secure the ends of the panels down to the frame. This is a little tacky looking but makes removing the panels a breeze. Each hole was marked and pre-tapped a little undersized. This was done to safeguard against marring up the panel, which inevitably would have happened had I relied on the wobbly self tapping skrew bit to drill the hole. The shock towers were cut down to accept a motorcycle shock absorber. These aren’t as stiff as the original shocks. I’m hoping for a smoother ride.

Motorcycle Trike

Motorcycle Trike

Those are hot air vent holes. Engine ducting will come later.

 

Motorcycle Trike

Motorcycle Trike

This is the second version of my first attempt at creating a safe enclosed trike for commuting.

Motorcycle Trike

Motorcycle Trike

Motorcycle Trike

Motorcycle Trike

Motorcycle Trike

Motorcycle Trike

It started with a 1972 Honda CB 350 that someone had given me. The base frame is 1.5″ square tubing bent by hand on a brake made from plywood.

Honda Trike

Honda Trike

Most of the frame is 1″ square tubing for ease of welding and body panel attachment. These were also bent using plywood brakes. ( hanging on the wall in picture)

Honda Trike

Honda Trike

This view shows the ‘Flintstone Reverse’ door, also good for future ventilation, and the double seat belt set-up.

Honda Trike

Honda Trike

The gear shifter was made from the old handlebar. Both electrical controls are mounted on both sides of the handle including the clutch lever.

Honda Trike

Honda Trike

I wanted a narrow teardrop body and a roadster looking front end. An ATV suspension was chosen for its durability and light weight components. I used a sandrail rack and pinion steering box along with the old front hydrolic brake off the bike. A single brake pedal was made for the rear wheel. Honda tires from the first civic model proved to be the best fit for the little 10″ ATV wheels.

Honda Trike

Honda Trike

This is what I made to figure out how to construct the body. A G.I. Joe 1/6th scale doll made the perfect model.

Honda Trike

Honda Trike

Comments are closed.